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Dungeons and Dragons

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This miniseries was inspired by Kate Shrewsday’s post here: http://kateshrewsday.com/2014/01/06/dragon-slayers-and-knuckerholes/

Historians argue about initial sightings of the New World. Few people really believe Christopher Columbus discovered America in 1492, especially given that people had already been living here for centuries.

But how did they get here? Who from the outside (or from ‘off’ as we would say in Charleston) saw them first?

Most historians agree that the Native Americans migrated over a land bridge from Siberia to modern day Alaska. The earth was cooler then; the seas lower. Maybe they didn’t even realize how far they wandered, until the ocean cut them off from their former home.

They were fruitful. They multiplied. They spread all over the crannies of two continents.

Yet, some of their rituals didn’t fit with where they came from. They built ziggurat-like structures that were somewhat Phoenician. One historian devoted a whole book to evidence of how the Chinese discovered America. Archeological digs have proven that the Vikings settled at present-day Newfoundland, and many believe they traveled as far south as New York State.

Thomas Jefferson heard a theory about the origin of some Native peoples. When he sent Meriwether Lewis and William Clark on their voyage of discovery, he encouraged Lewis to investigate. In the middle of the North American continent, they encountered blonde-haired, blue-eyed Native Americans, just as Jefferson supposed they would.

How could this have been?

To be continued tomorrow.

46 Comments Post a comment
    • I’ve always been fascinated with the Viking sagas. To now know that the sagas are backed up by physical evidence is really cool

      January 14, 2014
  1. Recent genetic studies point to the Americas populated for 35,000 years, lining up with previously ignored linguistic analysis pointing to 40,000 years in the Americas:

    http://www.berkeley.edu/news/berkeleyan/1998/0311/linguistics.html

    Polynesian blood has been found in a tribe in South America and vice-versa:

    http://firstlook.pnas.org/polynesian-dna-found-in-ancient-native-american-bones/

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/8582150/Kon-Tiki-explorer-was-partly-right-Polynesians-had-South-American-roots.html

    …and there is much more. According to Blackfoot oral historian Floyd HeavyRunner (my close acquaintance for 36 years until he passed away this past Spring) the Blackfoot precursor people arrived in the Americas by sea and migrated from the south to north where they met and intermarried with a race of Whites during the time of Mammoths.

    Also it has recently been demonstrated a match for modern Native American blood has been found mixed with that of western Europeans in 24,000 year old bones discovered in Siberia:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/21/science/two-surprises-in-dna-of-boy-found-buried-in-siberia.html?_r=0

    This preceding is tip of the iceberg. If you wished to tell me Virginia Dare brought a vision to certain tribes of the Plains Indians, it would be less far-fetched that those scientists who cannot break their minds out of a one way street limited to ‘Beringia’ πŸ˜‰

    January 14, 2014
    • People always have to have angles for everything. Otherwise, they don’t have much to do. That’s where I think a lot of this comes from.

      January 14, 2014
  2. Reblogged this on My Blog.

    January 14, 2014
  3. I know where they came from.

    January 14, 2014
  4. Space aliens!

    Or Scandinavians in Minnesotta. http://www.kensingtonrunestone.us

    January 14, 2014
    • Vikings again. Though those Wisconsin Scandinavians make darn good pie.

      January 14, 2014
  5. I love history. The real history, not the one written by the winners or the invaders . . . or man.

    January 14, 2014
    • I wish we could know the real history. In researching my book, I was really surprised by the lengths Thomas Jefferson went to make sure history was kind to him. He was pretty ruthless about it.

      January 14, 2014
  6. This is always interesting, but it makes me wonder why does it spawn such intense debate? In the sake of our lives, does it matter if Columbus discovered the Americas or Leif Ericssan or Jimmy Joe Jim Job from spce?

    We seem to take sides on this question like our lives depend on winning the battle.

    January 14, 2014
    • For someone to get funding to write a paper or a book, they have to believe they’re right. People always love a good controversy, after all. πŸ™‚

      January 14, 2014
  7. tarakianwarrior #

    πŸ˜€ Thank you. Love this.

    January 14, 2014
  8. Fascinating!!!! Can’t wait for more!

    January 14, 2014
  9. This is one of the Great Mysteries and it endlessly fascinating. I look forward to this thread with great relish (and maybe some mustard).

    January 14, 2014
    • We’ll never solve the mystery. I think some of the speculations are really fun.

      January 14, 2014
  10. Tom and I discuss this often, he contending it was the Irish and St. Brendan, me the, the long suffering Penelope, positing the Greeks (originally blond, blue-eyed). We do this over leg of lamb and Irish soda bread. No one wins, but, mighty fine “discussions” ensue.

    Fun post, Andra, and I’ll look forward to part II.

    January 14, 2014
    • There’s quite a bit of evidence for the Phoenicians to have landed on this side of the world, even before the Greeks or Romans. I haven’t read about evidence for those two. Hmmmmm.

      January 14, 2014
  11. I love the fact that genetics can help us determine who was lying with whom.

    January 14, 2014
    • Did you know Clark fathered at least one Native child on the expedition? They’ve done genetic testing to prove that. No Lewis kids so far, but I have a theory about that, too.

      January 14, 2014
  12. So damned cool. Can’t wait to read the rest.

    January 14, 2014
    • Tomorrow. πŸ™‚ I’d love to know what Scott thinks about all this as a historian. I could listen to historians talk for hours. I’m a weirdo.

      January 14, 2014
  13. I am hooked. What an interesting topic…

    January 14, 2014
    • One of many rabbit trails in book research. Ha. I got off on this for a couple of weeks.

      January 14, 2014
      • I know going down one of those rabbit trails isn’t very productive, but I always enjoy what I come out with. Normally random knowledge I store in my mental Rolodex for Trivial Pursuit, but still. πŸ˜‰

        January 14, 2014
  14. I’m looking forward to reading more tomorrow, rabbit trails can bring some of the best surprises. πŸ™‚

    January 14, 2014
  15. All I know about history is what Mel taught me. Which means I’m smarter than most Americans. That said, a sequel would help my continuing education greatly. One (or more) of these statements is a lie.

    I think…

    January 14, 2014
  16. Fascinating. I knew nothing about blonde and blue-eyed native Americans.

    Hope you are doing well, my friend. I have been so busy and not able to keep up with blogging. Sorry to have missed so much.

    Hugs from Ecuador,
    Kathy

    January 14, 2014
  17. I love, love, love history (you may have gathered that from my current WIPs). There is so much that we don’t know and the different theories are fascinating.

    January 14, 2014
  18. Thanks for the history lesson, Andra! Waiting for Part 2…

    January 14, 2014
  19. Andra, rarely have I been so eager to hear what a next post has to say. I am on tenterhooks. Or should I say, tenterclaws.

    January 14, 2014
  20. i have always been fascinated by this subject and look forward to reading more. i think with time, we will come to understand a lot and many of our old concepts of origin will be turned on their heads.

    January 14, 2014
  21. This is one of the favorite conversations in my family, Andra, and I’m looking forward to your series!

    January 14, 2014
  22. It is fascinating. I’m sure after very extensive research might find that it may have been … well, you may already know .. it was a Monaghan that landed in North America, via Ireland (it wasn’t called Ireland then, though).

    January 14, 2014
  23. History minor here. Love this stuff.

    January 14, 2014
  24. I like your theories! Staying tuned…

    January 15, 2014
  25. I seem to recall a discussion with a friend of mine, who is an archaeology grad student at Mercyhurst, in which a research team was trying to carefully extract evidence of an early European settlement out of the Chesapeake Bay that pre-dates Columbus. The trouble being is setting up a dig site underwater isn’t an easy task to accomplish.

    January 15, 2014
  26. Ooh, Andra! Now you have my full attention!

    January 16, 2014
  27. I love these different takes on history, Andra! And I’ve always been intrigued by the question how can someone have discovered somewhere, when there were already people living there… I’m off to read part two!

    January 17, 2014
  28. Few things thrill me like history. I am duly thrilled and about to read the second part.

    January 18, 2014

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